King Princess- A Royal Review

(Here’s Katie with a “you are there” glimpse of King Princess in concert. Props to Temple University News and Mamemagazine.com for publishing rights.)

  Jimmy  

On November 4, 2019, my life was changed. On a whim, I bought the cheapest concert ticket of my life and somehow got myself a front-row seat to the best concert I’ve ever seen (granted, I’ve only been to three others before).

It all started the week before when my friend, Kyleigh, asked me to go see King Princess with her. At the time, I had heard of King Princess before, but I hadn’t listened to a single song of hers. However, the tickets were cheap and I had nothing to do that night so I figured, why not? Usually when I buy something that impulsively it backfires horribly; but not this time. That concert was worth every penny- let me tell you why.

Now, if you are like I was, give one KP song a listen and you’ll assume she’s just like the hundreds of other soft-pop “indie” girls- and I’m not saying there’s anything wrong with that, but just keep in mind that’s what I was expecting when heading towards this concert. Thankfully, I was mistaken.

Surprisingly, her opener was a ballad titled Isabel’s Moment. This is a new song off her freshman album, Cheap Queen, which was released October 25. Even with the mellowness of the song, the amazing support of her backing band (who put on just as much as a show as she did) and KP’s charisma still made for a great opener to a show that would outdo itself with every song.

 

It seems to me that KP’s specialty is making pop in the studio and rock on stage. Had I not known any better, I would’ve thought she was a proper rockstar- almost every song had an interlude where her pianist, guitarist, bassist, or drummer would completely turn the song on it’s head and make it their own- I wish KP would release a live album just so I could relive those moments again.

Another standout of the show was King Princess’ stage presence. She’s not too much older than me- just 20 years old, and I know I don’t have the confidence or charisma to do a fraction of what she did on stage. She happily joked and interacted with the crowd, danced like no one was watching, and overall just had a joyously unhinged persona the entirety of the concert.

My favorite of her songs performed come down to these three: Talia, Hit the Back, and Ohio.

Talia, another ballad, went a completely different route than what I expected. Drawn out in the best way possible, energetic, and loud, it made Talia now one of my favorite KP tracks, when before I skipped over it about 90% of the time.

Hit the Back was her show-closer (minus the encore), and as one of her most energetic songs, it didn’t disappoint. Think bright, rainbow lights, charisma, and booming vocals.

Ohio, one of two unreleased tracks performed, blew me away. This was the actual show-closer (in which she ended by destroying the drum set, like a real rock star would and should), and it did not disappoint. Slow in the beginning, I was confused why she’d chose this, of all songs, to perform last. However, about halfway through, she completely shredded on guitar and I’d say there was a whole minute of everyone on stage (and on the floor, honestly) going batshit crazy. Now that’s what I was expecting from a show closer. All I can say is that I am anxiously awaiting her next album so I can get a studio version of Ohio.

Other standout songs included Prophet, Cheap Queen, Trust Nobody, You Destroyed My Heart, and Upper West Side.

All in all, if you ever get the opportunity to see King Princess live, do it. She puts on a show and makes sure that you’re having as much fun as she is. At the very least, give her new album and previous EP a listen, and catch her on SNL on November 23rd!

Here’s Hit the Back live on the Stephen Colbert Show, which was pretty similar to, if not tamer than, how she performed it in concert.

Katie

https://youtu.be/3TYznvuRMwk

Students explore fashion without dress codes

(Katie just wrote a very cool piece for the Temple University News recently for which I need to give props lest I get myself in legal trouble so here goes…)

Jimmy

Some female students at Temple find comfort in wearing what they want without repercussions. Fashion and clothing choices are ways for people to express their identities, and some Temple students who had dress codes at previous schools get to explore this.

Of the 17,000 people between the ages of 18 and 64 polled, 22 percent believe dress codes in high schools limit people’s freedom to express themselves, and 13 percent said it targets their gender in unfair ways, according to a 2017 survey by the Today Show.

Madison Joy, a freshman health professions major from Vermont, said she feels more liberated in college without a dress code.

“At Temple, I feel like I’m judged less, so I tend to be more daring in what I wear,” Joy said. “There are a variety of body types here at Temple so I feel more represented. When I see other girls that look like me wearing clothes I used to be too scared to wear, like crop tops, I feel affirmed that I really can wear whatever I like.”

In 2018, the principal of Oakville High School in Oakville, Missouri apologized to parents after telling female students they should not show off their bodies for fear of “distracting” male classmates, KSDK (Channel 5) reported.

Kate Kubiak, a freshman civil engineering major, said that because dress codes are no longer enforced in college, instructional time is not wasted because of how a girl is dressed.

“One time a girl in my class got [in trouble] for wearing a crop top and the whole process of her getting sent to the office was much more distracting than I think the shirt had the potential to be,” Kubiak said.

Nationwide, 53 percent of public schools enforced a strict dress code during the 2015-16 school year, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Teachers are more likely to discipline girls of color for minor offenses, like dress code policy violations, and are more likely to give them harsher punishments, according to a 2014 study by the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity.

Sociology Professor Amanda Czerniawski said dress code regulations are often directed at the female student body, which sexualizes young women.

“This raises the interesting question of whose responsibility is it to regulate teenage sexuality? Is it that of the girls, to prevent being a distraction to the boys? Or is it that of the boys to learn how not to be distracted by the girls,” Czerniawski said. “The answers to these questions reveal the gendered nature of human sexuality.”

Soumya Sam, a freshman psychology major, said without a dress code, she can now use fashion to express herself on campus.“I can be as conservative or revealing as I’d like, which helps with my confidence in my body and personal style,” Sam said. “I can be as daring as I want because I don’t feel like my body or clothes are being criticized.”

Sam said she is very excited to have chosen a supportive college.

“The environment at Temple is a lot more supportive because I can see a lot of different people and see myself in them which makes me feel more confident in many aspects of my life,” Sam added.

Katie