A Little Head Hunting

A few days ago I saw where the 2 goalies for the Carolina Hurricanes went down with injuries while the Canes were on the road in Toronto for a game with the Maple Leafs. Seeing as Carolina had no goalies available, the NHL rules stipulate that the home team (the Leafs) has to supply the opposing team with an “emergency” goalie, apparently meaning “anybody you can come up with”. (Kinda reminds me of the movie “Slapshot” with Paul Newman.) Anyhoo, the guy that the Leafs came up with was their f@&*ing zamboni driver (I’m dead-on serious here). The guy’s name is David Ayres and he will live in history along with Miracle on Ice team as one of the most insane and improbable developments in hockey history. The beauty part is that he actually recorded a win, stopping 8 out of 10 shots with a defense that musta been goin’ beserk trying to limit shot opportunities. The zamboni driver. Yeah man. Sign me up every time.

With all due respect to Bill Murray in “Caddyshack” (“the crowd goes silent as they await the new Masters champion”), you my friend are a full-on liar if you never fantasized about saving the day in a crucial sports situation. (“My God, Carl Yastrzemski has broken his ankle on a 3 and 2 count in extra innings and there’s nobody left to replace him! But wait! Here’s Jimmy coming down from the stands to stand in! Can you believe it folks!!??Here’s the pitch!! Holy Mackerel!! It’s over the wall for a Red Sox win!!!)

Next up, I enjoy watching the show “Ghost Hunters” whereby the hunters go into various places at night, flip the lights off to the point where their suddenly tripping over stuff in order to find evidence of spiritual activity with fascinating results. Ask yourself this question, “what amount of paranormal events would it take to freak me the hell out to the point where I become a God-Fearin’, full on believer in the afterlife”? I believe I know the answer to this inasmuch as I’d probably draw the line at a screaming, disembodied head floating across my bedroom.

Last, I saw a replay of the Rolling Stones concert in Havana, Cuba on AXS TV last night that I thought might not be so great inasmuch as the Stones were pretty much fossils and couldn’t execute in the way they did during their prime. Wrong!! That show was so spectacular that I think it’ll stick w/me forever even tho I wasn’t actually there. The highlight here was backup vocalist Sasha Allen who took a legendary rock and roll song and managed to ramp it up beyond what it already was.  (Listen to how sloppy this performance was at the opening and then pay attention to how strong and tight they sounded after she sauntered up to the front of the stage and HOWLED out her vocals. Not content w/that she then brings the best anti-war song ever to it’s conclusion with her smooth, haunting style over a suddenly strong rhythm section that brings back the effect of an urgent ticking clock.)

Sometimes it does take a woman’s touch to straighten out the guys. Here’s the video and don’t be afraid to say Hiya Fathead!

Jimmy

 

The Year of the Rat

When I post articles from other contributors (in this case Kate) I try to shy away and let  their pieces speak for themselves.  Not this time. For instance, I enjoy learning about different cultures even to the point of embracing them and therefore flattering myself as a forward-thinkin’, open-minded contributor to world society despite my spectacularly noteworthy flaws. Here’s one of ’em…

“The Year of the Rat”? Seriously?  Of all the critters in God’s kingdom why a rat? Then I evened myself out again in a trying-to-be-understandin’ kinda way whereupon I figured there’s a secretive yet powerful community in China that exalts the nobler qualities of a varmint that would be shot on sight here in the good ol’ US of A.

The result of my subsequent investigation was that there ARE no superb qualities to a rat. IT’S A F&%@ING RAT! (Beg yer pardon. Got a little outta line there.) Anyway, the following whizbang article was written by Kate for The Temple Daily News…

Jimmy

Temple students celebrate Lunar New Year on campus

The Confucius Institute held its fourth annual Lunar New Year celebration on Monday.

(From left to right) Qiwen Yuan, Eddie Chia-Hao Hsu and Aris Tang perform “The Triad of Plum Blossoms,” a traditional Chinese song and dance, at the Confucius Institute at Temple University’s Lunar New Year festival at the Student Center on Monday. CLAUDIA SALVATO / THE TEMPLE NEWS

The Confucius Institute at Temple University hosted a celebration on Monday to ring in the 2020 Lunar New Year, which started on Jan. 25 and ends on Feb. 4.

Entertainment included traditional Chinese activities, like a Chinese tea making table, a calligraphy display, a paper cutting activity and various live performances.

Lindsay Fink, a senior global studies major, who was working at the event, discussed the importance of this celebration on campus.

“There’s not a lot of Chinese New Year events in Philly, so it’s nice to have something on campus,” Fink said. “Like, imagine living somewhere where there’s no decorations for Christmas.”

Aris Tang, a management and information systems major, plays the zheng at the Confucius Institute at Temple University’s Lunar New Year celebration at the Student Center on Jan. 27. | CLAUDIA SALVATO / THE TEMPLE NEWS

Since Spring 2016, the Confucius Institute has been providing Chinese language resources for international and domestic students, including a Chinese tutoring program, interpreters for Chinese students during student conduct cases and summer trips to China for Temple students and faculty.

“As a center that promotes Chinese culture and language, it is important for us to hold a Lunar New Year celebration to share the holiday and its traditions with others,” said Ashley Phifer, coordinator at the Confucius Institute. “It also provides our Chinese community here on campus a place to celebrate the holiday with others.”

This Lunar New Year marks the beginning of the year of the rat. The Chinese Zodiac, an ancient system based on the lunar calendar, decides which animal will represent each new year, Time Magazine reported.

Lunar New Year traditions include cleaning one’s bedroom on Lunar New Year’s Eve “to bring good luck to the new year,” said Yingru Zhao, instructor at the Confucius Institute.

“In China, it is the greatest and most important festival…it’s like Christmas,” Zhao said.

Po-sung Hsu, a first year business analytics graduate student, attended the event. His family always comes together for the Lunar New Year, he said.

“On Chinese New Year’s Eve, we [family] have a reunion dinner, and after, the parents and grandparents give out red envelopes with lucky money inside,” Hsu said.

Observing cultural holidays and taking part in celebrations can make students feel more connected with the language they are studying, Zhao said.

“To learn language, you need to know a little background about the culture…in Chinese textbooks we learn about food and Lunar New Year … we celebrate Lunar New Year here because it evokes emotion, despite not being in China.” Zhao said.

Freshman advertising major Alea Burns, who is currently taking a Chinese language class, said she was at the event to familiarize herself with the culture.

“I’m planning on studying abroad in China next year, so I want to dip my toe into the culture,” Burns said.

The Confucius Institute exists to make students feel at home no matter where they’re from, Phifer said.

“Overall, we’re here to provide a safe, warm, inviting environment for any student that comes to our office,” Phifer added.

Katie

Students explore fashion without dress codes

(Katie just wrote a very cool piece for the Temple University News recently for which I need to give props lest I get myself in legal trouble so here goes…)

Jimmy

Some female students at Temple find comfort in wearing what they want without repercussions. Fashion and clothing choices are ways for people to express their identities, and some Temple students who had dress codes at previous schools get to explore this.

Of the 17,000 people between the ages of 18 and 64 polled, 22 percent believe dress codes in high schools limit people’s freedom to express themselves, and 13 percent said it targets their gender in unfair ways, according to a 2017 survey by the Today Show.

Madison Joy, a freshman health professions major from Vermont, said she feels more liberated in college without a dress code.

“At Temple, I feel like I’m judged less, so I tend to be more daring in what I wear,” Joy said. “There are a variety of body types here at Temple so I feel more represented. When I see other girls that look like me wearing clothes I used to be too scared to wear, like crop tops, I feel affirmed that I really can wear whatever I like.”

In 2018, the principal of Oakville High School in Oakville, Missouri apologized to parents after telling female students they should not show off their bodies for fear of “distracting” male classmates, KSDK (Channel 5) reported.

Kate Kubiak, a freshman civil engineering major, said that because dress codes are no longer enforced in college, instructional time is not wasted because of how a girl is dressed.

“One time a girl in my class got [in trouble] for wearing a crop top and the whole process of her getting sent to the office was much more distracting than I think the shirt had the potential to be,” Kubiak said.

Nationwide, 53 percent of public schools enforced a strict dress code during the 2015-16 school year, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Teachers are more likely to discipline girls of color for minor offenses, like dress code policy violations, and are more likely to give them harsher punishments, according to a 2014 study by the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity.

Sociology Professor Amanda Czerniawski said dress code regulations are often directed at the female student body, which sexualizes young women.

“This raises the interesting question of whose responsibility is it to regulate teenage sexuality? Is it that of the girls, to prevent being a distraction to the boys? Or is it that of the boys to learn how not to be distracted by the girls,” Czerniawski said. “The answers to these questions reveal the gendered nature of human sexuality.”

Soumya Sam, a freshman psychology major, said without a dress code, she can now use fashion to express herself on campus.“I can be as conservative or revealing as I’d like, which helps with my confidence in my body and personal style,” Sam said. “I can be as daring as I want because I don’t feel like my body or clothes are being criticized.”

Sam said she is very excited to have chosen a supportive college.

“The environment at Temple is a lot more supportive because I can see a lot of different people and see myself in them which makes me feel more confident in many aspects of my life,” Sam added.

Katie